De døendes kropper

Hva angrer de døende på? Og hva kan det lære oss om hvordan vi skal leve?

Too often, it’s only as a patient realizes that he or she will lose their body that they finally appreciate how truly wonderful it is.

«I am going to miss this body so much,» a different patient, many decades younger, told me.

She held her hands up in the dim light that seeped through the sunshade on the window. She stared at them as though she had never seen them before.

«I’d never admit it to my husband and kids, but more than anything else, it’s my own body I’ll miss most of all. This body that danced and ate and swam and had sex and made babies. It’s amazing to think about it. This body actually made my children. It carried me through this world.»

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Reklamer

Livets uungåelige traumer

Trauma is not just the result of major disasters. It does not happen to only some people. An undercurrent of trauma runs through ordinary life, shot through as it is with the poignancy of impermanence. I like to say that if we are not suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, we are suffering from pre-traumatic stress disorder. There is no way to be alive without being conscious of the potential for disaster. One way or another, death (and its cousins: old age, illness, accidents, separation and loss) hangs over all of us. Nobody is immune. Our world is unstable and unpredictable, and operates, to a great degree and despite incredible scientific advancement, outside our ability to control it.

Les mer hos The New York Times: The Trauma of Being Alive