Gode relasjoner endrer hjernen

Nydelig liten artikkel om hvordan hjernen vår endres av trygge relasjoner – både i terapirommet og utenfor: Hjernen formes av bruken.

– Hjernen formes av bruken. Vi kan lindre smerte ved å arbeide med hjernens grunnstemning. Overøse mennesker med alt de ikke har fått av trygghet tidlig i livet. Til dette trenger vi fagpersoner som har et avklart forhold til seg selv, sine egne følelser og som nettopp derfor klarer å bygge trygge relasjoner.

shutterstock_82829656

– Vi står overfor et paradigmeskifte der vi ser på menneskelig smerte på en helt ny måte. I stedet for å dele den opp i hundrevis av diagnoser, ser vi fra forskningen at alt handler om regulering av følelser, om den mellommenneskelige nevrobiologien. Om å endre hjernens grunnstemning ved å gi mennesker det de ikke har fått, for å bli trygge, sier Mogens Albæk og Heine Steinkopf.

Reklamer

Gi hjernen en ferie

Fra artikkelen «Hit the Reset Button in Your Brain«, The New York Times

This month, many Americans will take time off from work to go on vacation, catch up on household projects and simply be with family and friends. And many of us will feel guilty for doing so. We will worry about all of the emails piling up at work, and in many cases continue to compulsively check email during our precious time off.

But beware the false break. Make sure you have a real one. The summer vacation is more than a quaint tradition. Along with family time, mealtime and weekends, it is an important way that we can make the most of our beautiful brains.

0810BRAIN-master495

Increasing creativity will happen naturally as we tame the multitasking and immerse ourselves in a single task for sustained periods of, say, 30 to 50 minutes. Several studies have shown that a walk in nature or listening to music can trigger the mind-wandering mode. This acts as a neural reset button, and provides much needed perspective on what you’re doing.

Daydreaming leads to creativity, and creative activities teach us agency, the ability to change the world, to mold it to our liking, to have a positive effect on our environment.

7037262215_7248b2b008_z

If we can train ourselves to take regular vacations — true vacations without work — and to set aside time for naps and contemplation, we will be in a more powerful position to start solving some of the world’s big problems. And to be happier and well rested while we’re doing it.

Yoga stresser deg – og det er bra!

Fra bloggen «PreFrontal Nudity» i Psychology Today: Yoga: Changing The Brain’s Stressful Habits

As a neuroscientist, despite my initial incredulity, I came to realize that yoga works not because the poses are relaxing, but because they are stressful.  It is your attempts to remain calm during this stress that create yoga’s greatest neurobiological benefit.

Your brain tends to react to discomfort and disorientation in an automatic way, by triggering the physiological stress response and activating anxious neural chatter between the prefrontal cortex and the more emotional limbic system.  The stress response itself increases the likelihood of anxious thoughts, like «Oh god, I’m going to pull something,» or «I can’t hold this pushup any longer».  And in fact, your anxious thoughts themselves further exacerbate the stress response.

Interestingly, despite all the types of stressful situations a person can be in (standing on your head, running away from a lion, finishing those TPS reports by 5 o’clock) the nervous system has just one stress response.  The specific thoughts you have may differ, but the brain regions involved, and the physiological response will be the same.  The physiological stress response means an increase in heart rate, breathing rate, muscle tension and elevation of cortisol and other stress hormones.

Some people might think that the stress response is an innate reflex and thus can’t be changed.  To clarify, the response is partly innate and partly learned in early childhood.  Yes, the stress response comes already downloaded and installed on your early operating system.  However, this tendency is enhanced, by years of reinforcement.  In particular, you absorb how those around you, particularly your parents, react to stressful situations.  Their reactions get wired into your nervous system. However, just because a habit is innate, and then reinforced, does not mean it is immune to change.  Almost any habit can be changed, or at least improved, through repeated action of a new habit.